Trust’s Altitude

Where you stand, the power of your sight, the altitude at which you stand and the power that allows you to see, is all that defines trust. Many opaques will appear before your eyes, however, before trust is possible. Opaques that stay true to the purpose of not allowing you to trust; past experience and impatience, for example. They do not blind you, they only limit the distance of your vision. Not allowing the opaques to hinder your sight (by changing where you stand) is how you make trust possible.

Soul Mountain - 1

Trust is not blind, so blind trust is an oxymoron for me. How can you trust that which you do not know, do not see? It may not use eyes, but trust is based on a perception; through senses other than eyes. It “sees”.

Blind trust is mutant-superstition.

When you trust a person, you trust a person. When you trust God, you trust God. When you trust medicine, you trust medicine. There is no preface to it, nor an epilogue or a summary. There are no footnotes, no disclaimers. There is no condition. “As long as…” and “if” never occur when you speak of trust. There is no time-limit. It starts at a point and stops at another, if at all. There is no because that explains why you stop trusting.

Trust supersedes belief, which supersedes hope. (Though hope seems to be an exotic floating emotion.)

To seek confirmation is to violate trust. To remind is to violate trust.

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3 thoughts on “Trust’s Altitude

  1. i have always felt that trust comes intuitively. i mean, there are no second thoughts about trustin the people i do, thats how has been in my experience.

    you have put it across really well, i know what you mean.

    Like

  2. @Shaurya:
    The difference as such, is perhaps academic. They perhaps are two sides of the same coin, one coloured black, the other white.

    Your Q is more of of life’s general problems. Trust in yourself is also confidence?

    @Dharma:
    Well said. If you question and seek qualification, that doesn’t imply trust. That’s good shopping practice!

    Thank ye!

    Like

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