DNA of Sight

A Bit of a Blur

Is there a unique way of how we see things? And the things that we see? I believe there is.

It has been some time that I have been on Flickr; suffice to say I have many buddies there who are excellent photographers. During my Flickr Life, I have learnt a lot about photography, much more than I would have learnt in a formal setting.

When I think back
On all the crap I learned in high school
It’s a wonder
I can think at all
And though my lack of education
Hasn’t hurt me none
I can read the writing on the wall

And nearly as long as I have been on Flickr, I have had a RSS reader. And I have a feed that updates all photographs from my buddies on Flickr. Since I started, with about 7 – 8 contacts, I have 97 contacts. You can imagine that the feed gets updated very fast and becomes voluminous. Sometimes I have more than 300 posts (photographs) unread (unseen).

Kodachrome
They give us those nice bright colours
They give us the greens of summers
Makes you think all the world’s a sunny day, oh yeah
I got a Nikon camera
I love to take a photograph
So mama, don’t take my Kodachrome away

All things become interesting after a while and you hope to read everything that you add to your feed. The feeds just pile up and you wonder if you are asking too much of yourself or you aren’t reading enough.

If you took all the girls I knew
When I was single
Brought them all together for one night
I know they’d never match
My sweet imagination
And everything looks better in black and white

Coming back, is there a unique way of how we see things? And the things that we see? I believe there is. And I have learnt it because of my feed reader and my Flickr contacts. With more than 300 posts piling up. I usually quickly skim through all of them. The finger on the down arrow key works with the speed of sight (light?). As I scroll quickly, my eyes are fixed on the area where the photograph is to appear; adjusting for orientation of landscape, portrait, oddly cropped, and badly cropped photos

Kodachrome
They give us those nice bright colours
They give us the greens of summers
Makes you think all the world’s a sunny day, oh yeah
I got a Nikon camera
I love to take a photograph
So mama, don’t take my Kodachrome away

I can almost always identify the photographer without having seen the name of the photographer in the feed. Perhaps it is a style issue. I doubt it. Many photographers I know vary their styles. I think it is just the way people see things, what they see, subjects, and their point of view. Many of the photographers take photos of flowers, for example. I can, yet, (almost always) identify who it would be.

Is it about signatures?

Do we always know what we sign? Do we know that we sign?

Text in Italics, Kodachrome, by Paul Simon & Art Garfunkel.

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7 thoughts on “DNA of Sight

  1. I believe we do. I don’t know how many of us are conscious of making that sign.

    I have mentioned this before on several platforms that we all tend to see from our own window of perspective. We tend to see what we want to see. Which translates in the means of expression and communication we employ be it photography, writing or painting.

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  2. I’d like to think of it like a success formula – we repeat what we think works – consciously or subconsciouly. That in a way becomes our signature.

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  3. wonderful post…
    we also differ in what we show– dressing, thoughts, habits, all combine to be the sign or identity of a person..
    the Kodachrome song / poem is beautiful..

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  4. ==Jolvin:
    Perhaps, yes. In the experience I had, it seems almost sub-conscious, however.

    ==DR:
    Thank ye!

    ==Gauri:
    Thank ye! I guess so, all these acts combine together and form our identity in a sense, then. The song is by Simon & Garfunkel 🙂

    ==Dharma:
    Is that conditioning? Hmm. Interesting thought. S&G always rock!

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