Namesake’s Overcoat

If you plan to read The Namesake in the recent future, may I suggest that you read The Overcoat before you do. If you can’t, then may I suggest that you read The Overcoat, after you read The Namesake. And even if you don’t read The Namesake, may I suggest that you read The Overcoat, here.

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11 thoughts on “Namesake’s Overcoat

  1. I have read only a chapter from The Namesake but I watched the film in full. And I didn’t read The Overcoat, thanks for the link. I’ll print it tonight and it’ll be a late reading session.

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  2. ==Sush:
    Great – hope you enjoy it – let me know what you think! I’ve been well – you?

    ==Explorer:
    Not that I resent it or anything, but I can’t help observe that this is possibly (a) the shortest comment from you ever and (b) one that doesnt have a single English word! 🙂 Long time – how (and where) have you been?

    ==TeaCutter:
    OK, so you woke up late today – how did you like it?

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  3. I was just speaking the universal language to leave no room for ambiguity!!! hahaha…

    Yeah, I know it’s been a long time. I read your comments on my blog and I keep myself updated on your blogs as well. Just that work has me tied up that at the end of the day, all I want is to be away from anything that emits light artificially! Other than that, there’s just one or two complaints. 😉 Good to see you doing well!

    This weekend perhaps!

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  4. Pingback: Writing about Tractors « Gaizabonts
  5. Can you explain how reading ‘The Overcoat” sheds light on THE NAMESAKE? I read the story and can’t see anything particularly meaningful to the experience of the novel other than a better understanding of Ashoke. I expected from your comment that some essential point would emerge. Am I being obtuse?

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  6. ==Constance:
    Welcome to Gaizabonts!

    I can’t explain. Really. If at all, there is a theme of identity building/creation/definition/loss in both the stories. Then again, these are stories where you find your own meanings and you read them again and find new meanings.
    🙂

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